EPISODE 11: GRACE PUNDYK

December 26, 2017

Episode 11: Channeling Creative Wisdom with Grace Pundyk

Grace's favorite childhood flower + 3 words she used to describe it:
Rose: Durga, Heaven-Scent, Fullsome.
Gardenia: Precious, Fragile, Powerful.

grace pundyk

LISTEN to this episode on: iTunes  | Google Play

I've been a fan of Dr. Grace Pundyk since she wrote the book, The Honey Trail, a journey around the world looking at the disturbed bee populations + special honeys from around the world. Aside from being a Melbourne-based traveler + author, she is a dancer, an artist and a playwright! Over the last few years, she has been working on a wildly creative project for her PhD called, Invisible Worlds, which started when she found a handful of letters from her Polish grandmother in her father's belongings after he died. Join us on the most recent podcast to hear about how she translated the experiences of her grandmother (who died in a Siberian work camp) into her latest project, which led to her teaching herself how to skin wild marsupial roadkill in Tazmania. Yes, you read that correctly; it's fascinating. In a deep and meaningful conversation, we talk about storytelling, simultaneously healing the wounds of our ancestors and children, death, telling the stories of the forgotten ones, following your intuition and how to use creativity to express new and ancient languages of the heart. If you're the kind of person who likes to stretch yourself outside the box, or you could use some loving, supportive tips to 'go for it' in your next weird + wild creative endeavor, have a listen.

Grace describes her work as inhabiting a ‘strange periphery’: she’s performed in a giant birds nest (to the sound of birdsong); on a moving river barge, at 4am, amidst giant floating lotuses; and staged theatre performances inside a freight car at a rail yard. Her books include the global travel narrative The Honey Trail (St Martin’s Press, 2010), and Sons of Sindbad: the photographs (Arabian Publishing, London, 2006).

Appearances at various festivals include Ten Days on the Island, the Melbourne Festival, White Night, and the Sydney and Brisbane writers festivals. Her play, Steppe (a journey of un-forgetting), premiered at the 2015 Melbourne Fringe Festival and was short-listed for the Rodney Seaborn Playwrights Award 2016. Steppe was recently selected for the 5th International Women Playwrights Conference, to be held in Santiago, Chile in 2018.

What you'll hear in this episode:

  • Ancient languages: ways of re-connecting with the past
  • Different ways we can connect with the land around us
  • Tapping into creativity to aid in healing
  • Respecting the cycles of life
  • Why it's important to understand the experiences of your ancestors
Contact Grace Pundyk:
Visit her website!

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.